Welcome to the Voice Body Connection blog! If you want to get my weekly “How To Warm Up” videos in your inbox weekly, along with info that I only share in newsletters (personal updates, discounts, etc) you can opt in here. Enjoy the posts!

xo,

Quick Articulator Sequence (Articulation)

Today’s How To Warm Up video is quick, easy, and goofy as usual. Check out my favorite warm up sequence for the articulators – namely the lips, tongue, and jaw (and a little somethin’ somethin’ for the skull too because it feels good!). If you get really good at this one, you can probably do the whole thing in under a minute. In fact, I’d like to see you try (yes that’s actually a challenge – post a video on my facebook page if you’re brave enough!!)

Check out the “Quick Articulator Sequence” exercise here:

Can’t wait to see your scrunched faces.

xo,

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Easy Onsets

Have you heard of something called a glottal attack? It sounds violent, and in fact it can be for your vocal cords! A glottal attack (also called a glottal onset or glottal stop) is when you press your two vocal cords together firmly, and then explode them apart to begin making sound. It makes a sort of clicking or popping noise… Britney Spears does it at the beginning of the phrase when she says “Oh baby baby” in this song, and every time Michael Jackson grunts in Billie Jean it’s a glottal stop too.

Though it’s not inherently an evil thing to do (❤️ you Britney and MJ), habitual glottal onsets can cause excess tension in your throat. What’s the antidote? Practice today’s easy onset exercise to learn how to begin phonating – that’s the fancy way of saying making sound – with ease and flow! It’ll make your voice sound smoother, and it’s simply easier on your throat.

Check out the “Easy Onsets (Sound)” exercise here:

HI hope you henjoy this hexercise 😉 😝.

xo,

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Notice What’s In The Room (Impulse)

Today’s warm up exercise is very powerful for connecting your impulses to your ability to express yourself. It’s a simple exercise that I call “notice what’s in the room,” and it’s a way to practice being more present and expressive. Since it pertains to the first step in the whole “How To Warm Up” sequence (revisit the intro video if you don’t know what I mean), it’s a fundamental exercise that I highly recommend practicing daily until it comes easily and smoothly.

Check out the “Notice What’s In The Room” exercise here:

Enjoy and let me know if you’re getting better at this as you practice!

xo,

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Stick Your Tongue Out

So when I say stick your tongue out, I don’t mean in the bratty way. I mean that when you leave your tongue outside your mouth while you speak or sing, it helps you release the root of your tongue so you can articulate with more clarity and ease! 👅 😝

Of course, the goofiness of the whole thing is simply an added bonus. So check out this week’s How To Warm Up video and practice leaving your tongue outside of your mouth. And just for fun… if you’ve got a good tongue twister we should all try doing with our tongues hanging out of our mouths, comment below the video to share!!

Watch the Stick Your Tongue Out exercise (body) here:

xo,

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Circling

Chances are really good that you’ve done some version of today’s How To Warm Up exercise before… it’s circling through all the major joints of the body. Circling is incredibly valuable because activates the fluid in our joints, and moves our bones and muscles in relationship to each other. This invites our whole body to be more moveable and follow our impulses with ease. Plus circling is simple, easy to do, and socially acceptable in most circumstances… so check this video out and let’s get circling!

Watch the Circling exercise (body) here:

Happy circling friends!!

xo,

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Tongue Circles

In today’s How To Warm Up video, we’re doing a simple, awesome articulator workout that I call tongue circles. Tongue circles are a great way to give your tongue a thorough workout. What’s the value of that? Well when you understand what it feels like to reallllly engage the muscles of your tongue, it helps you understand what it feels like to let them go! And then you can be more cognizant of only using your tongue only as much as necessary during speech or singing, rather than over-engaging it, which is a common problem.

So let’s dive into tongue circles! Here we go…

Watch the Tongue Circles exercise (articulation) here:

Like making out, but you can do it all on your own! 😝😂 😜 😍

xo,

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The Camel Stretch

Alright friends… today’s How To Warm Up video is goofy. Watch me make some funny faces as I demonstrate how to do the “camel stretch” to release the muscles through the front of your neck and your jaw. It’s ridiculous, it’s amazing, and it’s a fabulous stretch.

By the way – a huge thank you and big love to my teacher and friend Paul Backer for teaching me this one. Paul is no longer with us, but he brought so many students at the University of Southern California and beyond joy with this exercise and many others. We love you and miss you Paul.

Alright – here we go… the camel!

Watch the Camel Stretch exercise (body) here:

Extra bonus points if you take selfies while you do this and post them below!! 😜

xo,

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The Zipper

Today’s How To Warm Up video is going to teach you a really simple exercise to “stretch” your vocal cords. Yes is it’s true, that’s possible… just like any other muscle, your vocal cords can stretch! And when they do, it actually raises your pitch. So you’ll learn this very simple, useful warm up that moves from the top to the bottom and back up to the top of your pitch range to stretch and release your vocal cords smoothly. Let’s zipper!

Watch the Zipper exercise (sound) here:

Have fun confusing your neighbors!! 😝

xo,

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Trills

Do you know what a trill is? Maybe you know you can’t do one? Well in today’s How To Warm Up video, we’re going to use a bilabial trill (that’s a fancy way of saying a trill with your two lips) to warm up your voice and your lips. Plus trills are totally awesome because they help calibrate your airflow… you’ll only be able to set them into this rapid vibration trill motion if you’ve got an ideal amount of air flowing through your vocal cords. Huzzah!

Alright let’s try some lip trills…

Watch the Trills exercise (articulation) here:

xo,

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Do What Feels Good

In today’s How To Warm Up video, I’m in the studio with plenty of space to move around so I can show you the “Do what feels good” exercise. This one is really important, and here’s why… yes I’ve created this How To Warm Up video series so that you can watch the Intro video, understand how to structure a warm up, and put together one of your own using all the videos in the playlist. But some days that’s just too heady/too by-rote/too prescriptive. Some days you just gotta follow your intuition and do what feels good. So check out this video to learn how following your impulses can help you do your perfect warm up.

Watch the Do What Feels Good exercise (impulse) here:

xo,

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